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If You Could Give One Piece of Advice, What Would It Be ...


A few weeks ago, I had the great opportunity to be a part of Google Hangout for +Ed Tech Crew Episode 238. The big question being addressed was: If you were only able to give one piece of advice to a new ICT Co-ordinator in a school, what advice would you give them. Although I have had a go at outlining my thoughts elsewhere, here are the gems offered by the wider team ...



+Ashley Proud - Be relentless with whatever you do.
+Mick Prest - Make sure that you are connected to a wider community.
+Mel Cashen - Have both short and long term goals, don't just think about right here, right now.
+Lois Smethurst - Narrow your field of focus to something that you believe is going to make a difference with.
+Darren Murphy - Go and listen to people, get teachers and leadership on board
+Aaron Davis - Create a team and develop a collaborative plan.
+Roland Gesthuizen - Coach the kind of learning that you want to be happening and be disruptive, facilitate the learning rather than mandate it.
+Tony Richards - Just have a go at doing something, this includes modelling the behaviours that you want people to have.
+Darrel Branson - Develop relationships in and out of the school.

What are your thoughts? Is there something that has been missed that you would add? Keep the conversation going either below or on Twitter.


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